Sunday, August 28, 2011

"Half of all Americans to be obese by 2030"

Good Sunday Morning...

Woke up to an article in The Huffington Post's section on health entitled... "Half of all Americans to be obese by 2030".

There is no reason for this.  We know how to reverse it.  Diets come and go but facts are facts.  In nutritional science there are foods that are considered essential for human life and those that are not.

Proteins are essential.  The word protein means "of first importance".  You need at least 12 of the 20+ proteins from foods to remain healthy.  Fats are essential and you need at least 3 to remain healthy.   60 minerals and 16 vitamins are essential. Carbohydrates are NON-essential but fruits and veggies that are colorful are loaded with antioxidants and nutrients that are beneficial like fiber.
All other carbs increase our odds of becoming sick and overweight.

The secret to a long and healthy life is found in this section of Dr. Joel Wallech's Lecture... Look for it...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-HH9DG9iieE&list=PL811EF80F34267E14&index=3&feature=plpp

Also, as we grow older, our genes become less and less likely to deal well with "new foods" like grains, legumes, and dairy (especially milk).  Most inflammation comes from one or more of these food types.

Sorry, I don't make the rules, I just observe them.

Specific health issues that can be fixed with a Paleo Diet...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEEI4HTIpKs&feature=related


"You're never too old to become younger" Mae West

Christopher Wiechert's Healthblogger is for educational or informational purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose or provide treatment for any condition. If you have any concerns about your own health, you should always consult with a health care professional. If you decide to use this information on your own, it's your constitutional right, but I assume no responsibility. The views expressed on this website are those of the health professionals & scientists I list or my own opinions and are not intended to replace any medical advice you may require. The contents have not been approved by the Pharmaceutical Association, the American Medical Association, or the Food and Drug Administration. This website may present views diametrically opposed to the views of such organizations. I also offer resources to products I formulate as well as those that I believe are of high value and quality. Profits from these recommendations are used to keep HealthBlogger free to those who read and appreciate the time and research that goes into these posts. It has been my experience over the last 30 years that if I offer reports and research without product recommendations, you will most likely pay more at the local health food store, and may not get the right product or the quality you would expect. I only recommend companies I respect and order from myself. I consider this a value added service that I offer along with the research. If you find this a conflict of interest, please don't order from my links.
Christopher Wiechert, C.N.C. is available for consultation, on your health issues. Contact Information: http://cwiechert.com/contactus.html


Help HealthBlogger grow and prosper…


Christopher Wiechert, C.N.C.
cwiechert.com - Take control of your own health
HealthBlogger - News and commentary on health, wellness and anti-aging
Protandim - 1 pill a day for 30 days reduces your cell's age to that of a 20 year old
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Phone: 541-447-4580

"The doctor of the future will prescribe no drugs, but will interest his patients in the care and nutrition of the human frame and in the cause and prevention of disease." - Thomas Edison

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Coronary Calcium Beats C-Reactive Protein for Predicting Heart Attack and Stroke Risk, Study Finds...

Preventing and removing calcium from soft tissues as well as raising HDL, lowering LDL, and reducing raging inflammation are all part of my Primordial Soup Nutrigenomic Anti Aging Breakthrough Program...

cw

Coronary Calcium Beats C-Reactive Protein for Predicting Heart Attack and Stroke Risk, Study Finds...

ScienceDaily (Aug. 20, 2011) — The presence of calcium in coronary arteries is a much better predictor of heart attack and stroke than C-reactive protein among people with normal levels of LDL cholesterol, according to a study of more than 2,000 people led by a Johns Hopkins heart specialist.
Results of the study, published in the August 19, 2011 issue of The Lancet, have important implications for deciding whether cholesterol-lowering statin medication should be prescribed for people who have heart disease risk factors but normal levels of LDL, the so-called "bad" cholesterol. An estimated 6 million American adults fall into that gray-zone category.

The goal of the new study, which followed 2,083 people for six years, was to further refine who was at higher risk and, therefore, might benefit from taking statin medications. Conversely, the study also looked to define which groups may be at low risk and not in need of the drugs. The participants in the study were volunteers in the ongoing Multi-Ethnic Study on Atherosclerosis, known as MESA, which is an NIH-funded Hopkins-affiliated study.

"This was a direct comparison to see which patients with a normal LDL level of less than 130 mg/dL would have the greater risk of having a heart attack or stroke -- those with evidence of calcium in coronary arteries, as determined on a cardiac CT test, or those with high levels of C-reactive protein, which is measured in blood and is an indicator of inflammation somewhere in the body," says Michael J. Blaha, M.D. M.P.H, a cardiology fellow at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Heart and Vascular Institute, who is the lead author of the study.

Blaha and colleagues found that 95 percent of the heart attacks, strokes or heart-related deaths in the study population occurred in people with some measurable calcium in their heart arteries. Meanwhile, 13.4 percent of those with the highest levels of coronary calcium (with scores greater than 100 on a calcium scoring test) had a heart attack or stroke during the study, whereas only 2 percent of those with high C-reactive protein in their blood, but no calcium buildup, had a heart attack or stroke.

In their study, the researchers determined that high levels of C-reactive protein in the blood, a score at or above 2 milligrams per liter, offered little predictive value after accounting for such risk factors as age, gender, ethnicity, hypertension, obesity, diabetes, smoking and a family history of heart disease.

"A calcium test directly looks for the disease we propose to treat with statins. Without measurable amounts of calcium, which indicates atherosclerosis, you are likely to be at very low risk in the short-term," explains Blaha.

This new study was designed to address some unanswered questions from a 2008 study called JUPITER, short for the Justification for the Use of Statins in Primary Prevention: An Interventional Tool Evaluating Rosuvastatin. That study found a 46 percent reduction in heart attacks among people with normal LDL cholesterol and a high level of C-reactive protein who took the statin medication rosuvastatin, which is marketed as Crestor.

JUPITER only included people with high C-reactive protein and none of those participants were tested to see whether they had evidence of calcium in their coronary arteries. So, Blaha says, it could not be determined from JUPITER whether people with low levels of C-reactive protein would benefit in the same way from statin therapy, or how the presence of coronary calcium may have affected the results.

All of the participants in the MESA trial had undergone coronary CT scanning, known as a calcium scoring test. Blaha and colleagues identified a group of participants in MESA who had high C-reactive protein levels and fit the criteria for JUPITER. The researchers also selected a group from MESA who had low levels of C-reactive protein. Then they were able to directly compare the prognostic importance of coronary artery calcium to C-reactive protein.

A statistical comparison of the results showed that among those with no measurable coronary calcium, it would be necessary to treat 549 patients with statin medication in order to prevent one heart attack. However, for those with high levels of coronary calcium buildup (with a calcium score greater than 100), the predicted number needed to treat to prevent one heart attack was only 24.

"Statin medications, which are a lifelong therapy, should not be considered the same as other preventive measures, such as diet and exercise, to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease," says Roger Blumenthal, M.D., a cardiologist, professor of Medicine and director of the Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease at Johns Hopkins. He also was a co-investigator on the new study. "All drugs have the potential to cause side effects in some people, although with statins, the side effects are rare," he adds.

According to Blumenthal, "Many patients fall into the gray zone of being healthy with normal LDL cholesterol, but also having some risk factors, including being overweight, having elevated blood sugar levels or a family history of heart disease. Our study provides clear evidence that high levels of calcium in coronary arteries will increase the risk of a heart attack or a stroke. And the risk increases with the amount of calcium, whether or not patients have high levels of C-reactive protein."

"While not everyone needs a calcium scoring test," Blaha says, "we believe looking for calcification in coronary vessels in certain patients makes sense in order to predict who may benefit from statin therapy because the test gets right to the heart of the disease we want to treat."

"Our data support recent American Heart Association guidelines, which say it is reasonable to order a coronary calcium scan for adults who are considered to be at intermediate risk of a heart attack over the next 10 years. A high coronary calcium score would indicate that statin therapy would likely be a useful strategy to lower that person's cardiovascular risk," according to Blumenthal.

In addition to Blaha and Blumenthal, other Johns Hopkins investigators involved in this study were study senior investigator Khurram Nasir, M.D., M.P.H., who is now at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn.; Andrew DeFilippis, M.D., M.Sc.; and JoĆ£o Lima, M.D. Other researchers were Matthew Budoff, M.D., at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, Calif.; Juan Rivera, M.D., M.P.H., and Arthur Agatston, M.D., both at the University of Miami; Ron Blankstein, M.D., at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston; and Dan O'Leary at Carney Hospital in Dorchester, Mass.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110818190555.htm


Christopher Wiechert's Healthblogger is for educational or informational purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose or provide treatment for any condition. If you have any concerns about your own health, you should always consult with a health care professional. If you decide to use this information on your own, it's your constitutional right, but I assume no responsibility. The views expressed on this website are those of the health professionals & scientists I list or my own opinions and are not intended to replace any medical advice you may require. The contents have not been approved by the Pharmaceutical Association, the American Medical Association, or the Food and Drug Administration. This website may present views diametrically opposed to the views of such organizations. I also offer resources to products I formulate as well as those that I believe are of high value and quality. Profits from these recommendations are used to keep HealthBlogger free to those who read and appreciate the time and research that goes into these posts. It has been my experience over the last 30 years that if I offer reports and research without product recommendations, you will most likely pay more at the local health food store, and may not get the right product or the quality you would expect. I only recommend companies I respect and order from myself. I consider this a value added service that I offer along with the research. If you find this a conflict of interest, please don't order from my links.
Christopher Wiechert, C.N.C. is available for consultation, on your health issues. Contact Information: http://cwiechert.com/contactus.html


Help HealthBlogger grow and prosper…


Christopher Wiechert, C.N.C.
cwiechert.com - Take control of your own health
HealthBlogger - News and commentary on health, wellness and anti-aging
Protandim - 1 pill a day for 30 days reduces your cell's age to that of a 20 year old
CW's Health & Wellness Online Mall - Look for nice discounts on quality health products
MBI Nutraceuticals - Glandular & Homeopathic Formulations
Facebook - Add me as a friend
Twitter - Follow me!!!
E-Mail - Send comments or questions you want HealthBlogger to address
Phone: 541-447-4580

"The doctor of the future will prescribe no drugs, but will interest his patients in the care and nutrition of the human frame and in the cause and prevention of disease." - Thomas Edison

Sunday, August 14, 2011

Kidney Disease - The Hidden Cause of Chronic Resistant Hypertension (High Blood Pressure).

The kidneys are the key organs that regulate systemic blood pressure.  They are the bean-shaped organs at the back of the abdominal cavity located below the lower margin of the rib cage and the upper limit of the pelvic cavity.  The two kidneys regulate blood volume, excrete acidic wastes, metabolize drugs, balance electrolytes, and produce hormones.  Yes, the kidneys do a lot more than make urine.  In Chinese medicine it is even believed that the force of the kidneys control the bones as well as fertility.  In this article I will focus on how renal disease can cause or provoke intractable high blood pressure.
Hypertension accelerates renal insufficiency.  The opposite is also true.  In physiology it is always thought that diseased kidneys need high blood pressure to maintain tissue perfusion.  This simply means that for the rest of the body tissues to keep on receiving nutrients and oxygen through the blood the kidneys have to raise blood pressure.  This is a natural survival mechanism which is incompatible with optimum health.
The renal vasculature is a low pressure bed.  In other words the kidneys are very sensitive to changes in blood pressure and tend to react with renal artery spasms (sclerosis) raising blood pressure through the renin-angiotensin-aldolsterone mechanism.  Don't let this throw you.   I will explain it.
Renin is the hormone that is secreted by the juxtaglomerular cells in response to decreased blood volume, low potassium, low adrenaline, or decreased renal perfusion pressure.  Renin then converts a 10-amino acid protein (packaged in the liver) called angiotensinogen to 8-amino acid polypeptide called angiotensin I. Angiotensin I is still inactive but is activated in the lungs by angiotensin converting enzymes (ACE) to the active angiotension II.  Angiotensin II is a potent vasoconstrictor.  At the same time renin also stimulates the suprarenal glands (the adrenals) to secrete a hormone called aldosterone which in turn stimulate the kidney nephrons to reabsorb salt and water to expand blood volume.  All in an attempt to raise blood pressure.
Now apart from atherosclerosis and blood viscosity the greatest cause of essential hypertension is glomerulo-sclerosis.  The glomerulus are the filtration apparatus of the kidneys.  Glomerulo-sclerosis is a fancy way of saying that the glomerulus are hardened with debris, fibrin clots (fibrosis), and acidic waste clogging the filters.  As a result the pressure builds up.  The inflow is now more than the out-flow.  The tubules or nephrons are also hardened at the same time.  We call this nephrosclerosis.  Diabetes can also accelerate this process as in diabetic nephropathy.
Please note that before hypertension is even diagnosed half of the kidneys are gone.  If your hypertension is accompanied by leg swelling, tiredness, and puffy eyes in the absence of heart failure your kidneys must have been sick.  The sad part is that renal function tests like blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine may still be normal at this point.
To avoid end-stage renal failure and attendant hypertension an ounce of prevention is always better than a pound of cure.  Stop all foods that hurt the kidneys like junk, fragmented, and devitalized foods.  All fried stuff, processed foods, drugs like asprin, too much refined sugar, heavy metals (lead and cadmium), heavy animal proteins, coffee, and anti-hypertensives (especially the diuretics).
To restore the kidney back to normal before it is too late you must do some debridement with enzyme blend containing proteolytic enzymes like nattokinase and serrapeptase, kidney friendly herbs like milk thistle, uva ursi, parsley, corn silk, and buchu.  Raw fruits and vegetables also help to restore renal vigor and function without harmful prescription drugs.  To get rid of heavy metals you do chelation with EDTA, malic acid, vitamin C, N-acetyl Cysteine, Magnesium, Vitamin B6, CoQ10, and Zinc.
Uzo Onukwugha seeks natural solution to health problems without resorting to harmful synthetic drugs.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Uzo_Onukwugha
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2989401


Resources that I use to help reverse this issue.
Sustained Release Arginine - 2 tablets 2 times a day -empty stomach

NAC - 1 cap twice a day

Reveratrol, Pomegrante and Grape Seed Ext - 2 caps 2 times daily

Serrapeptase - 1 to 2 caps daily w/ large glass of water away from food and arginine



Christopher Wiechert's Healthblogger is for educational or informational purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose or provide treatment for any condition. If you have any concerns about your own health, you should always consult with a health care professional. If you decide to use this information on your own, it's your constitutional right, but I assume no responsibility. The views expressed on this website are those of the health professionals & scientists I list or my own opinions and are not intended to replace any medical advice you may require. The contents have not been approved by the Pharmaceutical Association, the American Medical Association, or the Food and Drug Administration. This website may present views diametrically opposed to the views of such organizations. I also offer resources to products I formulate as well as those that I believe are of high value and quality. Profits from these recommendations are used to keep HealthBlogger free to those who read and appreciate the time and research that goes into these posts. It has been my experience over the last 30 years that if I offer reports and research without product recommendations, you will most likely pay more at the local health food store, and may not get the right product or the quality you would expect. I only recommend companies I respect and order from myself. I consider this a value added service that I offer along with the research. If you find this a conflict of interest, please don't order from my links. 

Christopher Wiechert, C.N.C. is available for consultation, on your health issues. Contact Information: http://cwiechert.com/contactus.html


Help HealthBlogger grow and prosper…


Christopher Wiechert, C.N.C.
cwiechert.com - Take control of your own health
HealthBlogger - News and commentary on health, wellness and anti-aging
Protandim - 1 pill a day for 30 days reduces your cell's age to that of a 20 year old
CW's Health & Wellness Online Mall - Look for nice discounts on quality health products
MBI Nutraceuticals - Glandular & Homeopathic Formulations
Facebook - Add me as a friend
Twitter - Follow me!!!
E-Mail - Send comments or questions you want HealthBlogger to address
Phone: 541-447-4580

"The doctor of the future will prescribe no drugs, but will interest his patients in the care and nutrition of the human frame and in the cause and prevention of disease." - Thomas Edison